Development Site - Changes here will not affect the live (production) site.

Challenging the Theophobia of Many Contemporary Social Scientists and Experts on Addiction

Where else than within the great traditions of our religions do we find the most cogent principles for helping individuals stuck in the psychic entropy of addiction?

A 1964 meeting of Alcoholics Anonymous. Philippe Le Tellier/Paris Match via Getty Images.

A 1964 meeting of Alcoholics Anonymous. Philippe Le Tellier/Paris Match via Getty Images.

Response
Aug. 17 2017
About the author

Paul McHugh, University Distinguished Professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, is the author of, among other works, Try to Remember (2006) and The Mind Has Mountains (2008) and co-author (with J.H. Hedblom) of Last Call: Alcoholism and Recovery (2007).


In “God, Religion, and America’s Addiction Crisis,” Jeffrey Bloom confronts head-on the fact that many contemporary experts have little use for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and its foundational presumption that addicts can find help from a “higher power.” Instead, these critics of AA would limit the study and treatment of addiction strictly to the realm of medicine and brain science.

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register Now

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register Now

More about: Addiction, Arts & Culture, Religion & Holidays, Science, Secularism